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Winter Top Tips: How to Keep Seniors Happy, Healthy and Warm

Winter Top Tips: How to Keep Seniors Happy, Healthy and WarmThe AgingCare.com forum is filled with people coming together to share valuable information. We’ve compiled experienced caregivers’ suggestions for keeping a loved one cozy, content and clean in spite of cold winter weather.

 Winter Skincare Tips

“Although many people use baby oil, it contains mineral oil and artificial fragrances. If your loved one has any chemical sensitivities (and a lot of older people do), it is best to stay away from any artificial fragrances, artificial ingredients and mineral oil. Try organic coconut oil for soothing and moisturizing dry skin. It is simple and very effective. I also recommend visiting a good health food store and asking about lotions that are all natural.” –oceansong

“My primary care physician (whom I hold in very high regard) recommends Eucerin lotion products. They are a little pricey, but they last forever. I think they also make a lotion specifically for diabetics.” –Miasmom1

“Many of us love the bath or shower to be very hot, especially when it is cold outside. However, high temperatures can be very drying for the skin. I know my hands also become super dry in colder weather. I tried just about everything, but my hands felt like I had a dozen paper cuts and I looked like I was attacked by my cats! Then I found O’Keefe’s Working Hands Hand Cream. It’s mainly advertised to men, but I tried it and so far, so good! It can be found in grocery stores and hardware stores.” –freqflyer

“My mom developed dry, irritated skin last winter, and I thought she was having an allergic reaction. When we went to the doctor, he called it ‘winter itch’ (a seasonal type of eczema). It was all over her body and, of course, she has opened some areas on her skin. We are using antibiotic ointment and heavy cream specially forumlated for eczema. This has helped a great deal in just a couple of days!” –Seastar

Staying Warm While Bathing in Winter

“Temperature! Turn up the central heat to keep the bathroom warm during bath time. Seniors are often cold, even when we are wearing short sleeves. If there is cold tile in the bathroom, cover it with a plush bath rug and make sure they don’t fall. If you have an overhead heater, turn that on, too. Wear light clothing so you do not get totally overheated while helping them!” –homeandhearth

“A radiant heater panel can be especially useful for bathrooms. During fall and winter, mine is plugged into a motion sensor timer that you set for automatic shut off. We have it set to go on when motion starts, and it goes off when no motion is detected for five minutes. It makes the bathroom warm (I go and trigger it before Mom goes into the bathroom for a shower), and there’s no risk of it tipping over because it’s anchored to the wall.” –glasshalffull

“I purchased a small fan heater for our bathroom. My loved one gets cold easily, especially since the water is not running on her constantly because she uses a shower seat while bathing.” –Anonymous6636

Ending the Thermostat Wars

“As people age, typically the circulation in their extremities (arms and legs) diminishes, causing them to feel cold. Any time you go to a senior living center, you’ll see older people dressed far more warmly than younger people because the seniors are chilly. They’ll even wear sweaters when it’s hot and humid outside. Low thyroid can be another cause of being cold, so be sure to get that checked. My mom’s thyroid quit working about two years ago. Once we got her on thyroid medications and got the dose regulated, she felt warmer and had more energy.” –blannie

“Last winter (out of desperation), my husband and I installed a programmable thermostat and we put it high enough that Mom can’t reach it to crank the heat up. It has worked so well without having to leave notes or try to remind her not to touch it.” –chrisblair63

“I use a Sunbeam heating pad on the back of my dad’s chair. I just saw that Sunbeam and Sure Fit offer heated slip covers, too. As for me, I have been spared by a tall Dyson fan. It makes very little noise and feels like the air it puts out is cooled even though it isn’t. I set it up pointed directly at my chair. It can also oscillate, but the stationary position is perfect since my dad does not feel it and I do. This setup has kept him warm and me cool—something that many caregivers struggle with.” –pipruby

“If you get an electric blanket, make sure it has a cutoff temperature. My mom hates my electric heating pad for her back because it will only keep a high temperature for so long and then it turns off as a safety feature. I told her it’s better than falling asleep on it and getting burned.” –timbuktu

“Beanbag/microwavable heat packs can be heated and strategically placed at the hip, stomach, back and feet. They also make a slipper version that has helped my mom with the Raynaud’s syndrome in her feet.” –glasshalffull

Indoor and Outdoor Safety Tips

“My dad has two walkers. There is one that he leaves in the garage after going all over the yard and through the snow/dirt. Mom won’t let him in the house with it unless he cleans it off, so Dad just bought another walker for indoor use only.” –freqflyer

“Your loved one’s favorite holiday decoration may be a fifty-year-old menorah or Nativity scene with incandescent bulbs. On all décor, check thoroughly for dried and cracking wires and loose connections on the plug. It may have been perfectly safe for many years, but old wiring causes many fires this time of year.” –pamstegma

“A word of caution: canes are terrible on ice. If your loved one needs someone or something to help them walk, it is better that they stay indoors until the weather improves. If they need to get out and about, have someone meet them at home to help them on snowy, icy walkways.” –freqflyer

“I worry when my mother-in-law runs the temperature up higher in her home due to her tendency to get dehydrated. Each and every time she has been hospitalized, it has been because of dehydration. It is common knowledge that it is easier for seniors to get dehydrated when it is hot outside, but it is also a serious issue during winter, especially for those who have trouble getting enough liquids. Help them hydrate any way you can!” –oldcodger2

Source: AgingCare.com

Early Diagnosis of Alzheimer’s Is Crucial for Effective Planning and Treatment

November is National Alzheimer’s Disease Awareness Month—an important opportunity to shed light on a condition that is often misperceived as untreatable. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) is the sixth leading cause of death in the United States, but dementia from Alzheimer’s continues to be underdiagnosed and underreported. In fact, according to a U.S. survey conducted by the Alzheimer’s Association, almost half of patients with AD are already in the moderate to severe stages by the time they are diagnosed. This lack of attention to the early stages of Alzheimer’s is unfortunate, because there are things we can do to help those who are starting to experience memory loss and support the people who are caring for them. Although a cure does not yet exist, available treatment options can help to slow down the progression of symptoms, especially if diagnosed early.

Caring for Someone with Alzheimer’s Disease

AD poses real challenges not only for the people diagnosed with the disease but also for the 15 million Americans who assume caregiving responsibilities. The multitude of obligations can have a huge impact on caregivers, with one out of every two of them developing major depression. The economic burden of providing care is huge as well. In 2016, the annual cost of care was $230 billion in the U.S. alone.

Many of my patients and their caregivers are hoping and waiting for a cure to become available. Even though there are novel drugs and other interventions in various phases of research and development, patients’ mental states continue to deteriorate with each passing day as their families wait for a disease-modifying treatment. The road to development and approval of a new drug is long and rigorous, and only a small percentage of medicines ever make it to market. This is time that Alzheimer’s patients simply cannot afford to waste.

A diagnosis will spur family members to start a conversation about planning for the future—a difficult, yet necessary discussion that they may have shied away from without a clear understanding of their loved one’s health. Timing is crucial because this planning phase must be done while the patient is still capable of sharing their wishes and competent to execute all the necessary legal documents, such as medical and financial powers of attorney, a will, advance health care directives, trusts, etc. These preparations enable the family to understand their loved one’s preferences for long-term and end-of-life care and give them the legal authority to see them through once their loved one has lost the ability to handle their own affairs.

The Treatment Journey

While there are no treatments available that can prevent, cure or change the underlying progression of Alzheimer’s disease, there are medications that can help minimize symptoms for a while. Once again, early diagnosis is key since each prescription is approved for different stages of the disease. These medicines can help people living with AD maintain their cognitive abilities and continue functioning at higher levels longer.

In addition to pharmaceutical treatments, there are also lifestyle choices that can help lower the risk of developing the disease and stabilize the symptoms of AD for those who already have it. These activities include regular physical exercise, stress management, proper diet, and prompt treatment of medical conditions like hypertension and high cholesterol. These lifestyle modifications can have a huge impact on a person’s brain health.

If you are concerned about a loved one’s memory, encourage them to go see a doctor. The good news might be that there is nothing to worry about, but if a problem is detected, ask about available treatment options. Early diagnosis and proactive treatment could help some of the 5.5 million Americans who are currently living with Alzheimer’s disease and their loved ones.

Source: AgingCare.com

Capgras Syndrome: How to Cope with a Loved One’s Delusions

Capgras Syndrome: How to Cope with a Loved One’s Delusions

Capgras is a type of delusional misidentification syndrome (DMS) that may present due to any number of neurological diseases or psychiatric disorders. Although the exact prevalence of this disorder is unknown, a 1999 study estimates that it is present in between two and 30 percent of individuals with Alzheimer’s disease. This disorder can seriously complicate a dementia patient’s quality of life and their caregivers’ efforts, so it is crucial to spread awareness of this little-known condition.

What is Capgras Syndrome?

“Capgras is a misidentification syn­drome characterized by the transient, recurrent, or permanent belief that someone known to a patient has been replaced by an impostor with a strong physical resemblance,” explains Erin Shvetzoff Hennessey, MA, NHA, CPG, and Vice President of Health Dimensions Group. “These delusions are suggested to stem from impairment of the brain’s facial recognition system and are also associated with brain lesions.” There is limited research available on this condition, but it affects those with a variety of neurological and psychological diagnoses, including schizophrenia, Alzheimer’s and other forms of dementia.

Capgras can be extremely stressful for the person with the syndrome, but it is also very disturbing for those around them. “While dementia caregivers usually anticipate a loved one’s forgetfulness and inability to remember close family members and friends, it can be very painful and confusing when this syndrome causes a different kind of loss of recognition,” laments Shvetzoff Hennessey. A loved one may remember their caregiver, spouse, or other relative—and may even ask for them by name—but they believe that this person is an impostor. Such delusions can make caregiving, family time, and other social experiences extremely painful and confusing.

Reality Orientation Techniques

When interacting with a person who is experiencing Capgras, it is common for caregivers and family members to attempt to correct or explain their delusions. A research article in the Frontiers in Human Neuroscience journal states that, “A defining characteristic of delusions also present in Capgras syndrome is that patients will firmly hold on to their delusional beliefs [even] in the presence of mounting contradictory evidence.”

While some caregivers may continue to correct sufferers and try to convince them that they are merely experiencing delusions, the use of reality orientation techniques for sufferers of memory loss has declined in recent years. “This strategy includes frequent reminders of present time, location and facts based in reality, including deaths, moves or other major life events,” Shvetzoff Hennessey explains. Reality orientation may be logical and appealing for those without Capgras but is often frustrating and upsetting for individuals who are experiencing delusions.

Validation Therapy

Shvetzoff Hennessey says that reality orientation has largely been replaced by validation therapy, which supports the patient’s delusions rather than correcting or contradicting these very real ideas, thoughts and feelings. Validation techniques have been found to reduce stress and anxiety in both dementia patients and their loved ones.

For some sufferers, neither reality orientation nor validation techniques are successful, leaving both the patient and their loved ones frustrated, lonely and anxious. For these situations, a mixture of several techniques may be needed in order for both parties to enjoy spending time together. “By working with the patient’s care team, including direct care providers, physicians, social work professionals, pharmacists and therapists, techniques and strategies can be developed to relieve the symptoms in the patient, as well as reduce the stress and frustration of loved ones,” advises Shvetzoff Hennessey. “This can include communication techniques, medications, and creative problem-solving methods.”

Interactions and Caregiving

Research shows that time and interactions with loved ones who have Alzheimer’s or other types of dementia is valuable for both the patients and their caregivers. However, this delusional condition can make it difficult, if not impossible, for the patient and the believed impostor to interact. Some patients may blatantly refuse to speak or cooperate with the “impostor.” Changing the format, timing and length of visits may help in some cases.

“If the patient does not live with those they do not recognize, these loved ones may have to visit during certain times of the day when the patient is more relaxed,” Shvetzoff Hennessey recommends. “Impostors” may need to visit along with other people that the patient recognizes, or even visit as a stranger, but these options may still allow for interaction.

Shvetzoff Hennessy emphasizes that safety and wellbeing are paramount. “If the patient’s delusions make caregiving, living together and safety challenging, housing changes may be needed to ensure the emotional and physical health of everyone involved.” In such cases, placement in a specialized memory care unit might be the best option.

Care for Yourself, Too

Alzheimer’s and dementia caregivers already experience serious emotional and physical strain, and this is only compounded by the development of Capgras syndrome. “It is important for family members and caregivers of sufferers to care for themselves in order to better care for their loved ones,” Shvetzoff Hennessey urges. This self-care can include increased time away from the patient, self-acceptance of limitations and reliance on other support systems including friends, family, and community and healthcare resources.

Interacting with Someone Who Is Suffering from Delusions

Shvetzoff Hennessey offers family caregivers the following tips for interacting with a person who is experiencing Capgras syndrome.

  • Validate their feelings and concerns. Rather than challenging their perspective, make it clear that you understand how they are feeling and that it is perfectly acceptable for them to feel this way. Try to identify with their reality rather than correct it.
  • Make a safe, emotional connection. Dementia alone can be extremely confusing and disorienting for a patient. Adding delusions that someone they trust has been replaced with an identical fraud can be very frightening for them. Remind the patient of how much you love them and how much the “impostor” loves them. If the patient has additional misconceptions that this fake is trying to harm them or steal from them, gently reassure them that they are safe and you will not allow anything of the sort to happen.
  • Rely on auditory interactions. Since this disorder makes it difficult or impossible for sufferers to visually connect with loved ones, sound is the next best way to communicate. Rather than visiting face-to-face, try conversing over the telephone or just outside of their line of sight. If a patient has difficulty interacting in person, it can help for the impostor to announce themselves while still out of sight. This helps to establish an emotional connection and begin a conversation that continues while they come into sight. This may assist the patient in positively identifying their loved one.

Source: AgingCare.com

Hallucinations, Delusions and Paranoia Related to Dementia

Hallucinations, Delusions and Paranoia Related to DementiaHallucinations, Delusions and Paranoia Related to Dementia

According to the Alzheimer’s Foundation of America, the major psychiatric symptoms of middle stage Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia include hallucinations, delusions and paranoia. About 40 percent of dementia patients experience delusions, while hallucinations occur in about 25 percent of cases. When a senior is experiencing hallucinations and delusions, their caregiver often wants to help them understand that these beliefs and experiences are not real.

 “It is not helpful to argue or rationally explain why something happened,” says Lisa P. Gwyther, associate professor in the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences at Duke University and director of the Duke Aging Center Family Support Program. “It just frustrates the person. They somehow know that you are not taking their thoughts and feelings seriously.”

While reinforcing reality seems like the logical and kind thing to do, this natural instinct can be wrong. Family caregivers can ensure they’re prepared to handle these challenging behaviors by learning the differences between them and proper coping techniques for each one.

 Understanding the Differences

Hallucinations, delusions and paranoia are symptoms of disease and not a normal part of aging. While they may seem similar, they are actually very different.

Hallucinations are false sensory experiences that can be visual, auditory and/or tactile. These perceptions cannot be corrected by telling a patient that they’re not real. Examples include a dementia patient hearing music when none is playing or seeing bugs on a surface where there aren’t any.

Delusions are fixed false beliefs that are not supported by reality. They are often caused by a faulty memory. Examples include accusing caregivers of theft and infidelity.

Paranoia is centered around suspiciousness. Elderly individuals often project hostility and frustration onto caregivers through paranoid behaviors.

Coping with Hallucinations

When it comes to handling a senior’s hallucinations, Dr. Marion Somers, author of “Elder Care Made Easier: Doctor Marion’s 10 Steps to Help You Care for an Aging Loved One,” suggests joining them in their version of reality. Ask them about what they are experiencing as if it is real so that you can more effectively defuse the situation. Refrain from trying to explain that what they are seeing or hearing is all in their head. “Otherwise, you’re going to aggravate them, and you don’t want to increase the level of agitation,” says Dr. Somers.

Reassure them by validating their feelings. Say something like, “I see that you’re upset. I would be upset if I saw those things, too.” Tell them that they are safe with you and you will do whatever you can to help them feel secure.

A comforting touch, such as gently patting their back, may help the person turn their attention to you and reduce the hallucination, according to the Alzheimer’s Association. You also can suggest that they move to a different room or take a walk to get away from whatever may have triggered the experience.

Realize that some hallucinations, such as seeing children or hearing music, can be comforting. If the individual is reassured by a hallucination, caregivers don’t need to do anything to stop it, Gwyther says. “You only need to respond to things that are scary or disruptive or keep the person from getting adequate care,” she says.

In addition to dementia, poor eyesight, hearing loss, certain medications, and physical problems like dehydration and urinary tract infections (UTIs) can contribute to hallucinations. If all other factors are ruled out and a loved one’s hallucinations are disturbing and persistent, then antipsychotic medication may be prescribed to reduce them. However, Gwyther says these medications can present a risk for dementia patients. She recommends first changing the way you communicate during these episodes and changing the activity and environment to remove or reduce triggers.

The Alzheimer’s Association offers these tips to change the environment:

  • See if any lighting or lack of lighting casts shadows, distortions or reflections on walls, floors and even furniture that could contribute to visual hallucinations.
  • Listen for any sounds, such as TV or air conditioning noise, which could be misinterpreted.
  • Remove or cover mirrors if they could cause someone to think they are seeing a stranger.

Dealing with Delusions

Delusions among dementia patients typically result from their cognitive impairment. They occur when a senior tries to make sense of a situation, but their confusion and memory problems make it impossible. “They end up filling a hole in a faulty memory with a delusion that makes sense to them,” Gwyther says. For example, if a loved one cannot find their purse, they may decide that it is missing because someone stole it.

Delusions can be frightening for the person living with dementia, but they can also be very hurtful for caregivers when they are the accused. Recognize that the elderly individual is living in a world that doesn’t make sense to them and is likely scared. Do not take any accusations personally or respond with logical explanations. Instead, reassure the person and avoid asking questions that may cause more confusion. If they are looking for an item, tell them you will help them find it. In cases where a loved one regularly misplaces an item and becomes agitated over the loss, the Alzheimer’s Association recommends purchasing a duplicate of the item to quickly resolve the issue until the original is found.

Distraction is another strategy that dementia caregivers use in response to delusional thinking, but it may not work for every patient or every delusion. If a loved one is experiencing a mild delusion, offering a favorite snack or activity or asking them to tell you about an important experience in their life may be sufficient to redirect their attention. In cases where the person is very upset, reassurance may be the only viable option. Again, it is crucial to avoid rationalizing the situation and stress your commitment to their security and happiness.

Responding to Paranoia

Paranoia is less common than delusions and hallucinations but can still be very troubling. According to the Alzheimer’s Association, when paranoia occurs, caregivers can assess the problem by considering these questions:

  • What happened right before the person became suspicious?
  • Has something like this happened before?
  • Was it in the same room or at the same time of day?
  • Can this trigger be removed or altered to avoid eliciting suspicion?

If someone is experiencing paranoia, it is important to discuss their medications (prescription and over the counter drugs as well as vitamins) with their doctor. “Sometimes medications interact with one another or the dosages are too large,” notes Somers. “That can bring on paranoia, but a doctor can address problems and adjust the senior’s regimen to minimize issues.”

Recognizing the causes for all three behaviors and understanding what a loved one goes through while enduring hallucinations, delusions and paranoia can help you both keep calm and find solutions.

Source: AgingCare.com

Ask your doctor the right questions about your Alzheimer’s diagnosis

Just Diagnosed

Receiving a diagnosis of Alzheimer’s is never easy — it’s life changing. It is normal to experience a range of emotions. Acknowledging your feelings can be an empowering first step in coping with the challenges ahead.

Emotions you may have

You noticed symptoms. You made a doctor’s appointment. You took tests. And you felt a roller coaster of emotions — fear, hope, despair, denial. Then you received a diagnosis. You may have felt numb, unsure of how to respond or where to turn.

You also may be grieving over the present losses you are experiencing, or the expectation of future changes as the disease progresses. It can be helpful to identify and understand some of the emotions you may experience after receiving your diagnosis.

These emotions may include:

  • Anger. Your life is taking a different course than the one you and your family had planned. You cannot control the course of the disease.
  • Relief. The changes you were experiencing were cause for concern. A diagnosis validated these concerns by assigning a name to your symptoms.
  • Denial. The diagnosis seems impossible to believe. You may feel overwhelmed by how your life will change as a result of Alzheimer’s.
  • Depression. You may feel sad or hopeless about the way your life is changing.
  • Resentment. You may be asking yourself what you did to deserve your diagnosis or why this is happening to you and not someone else.
  • Fear. You may be fearful of the future and how your family will be affected.
  • Isolation. You may feel as if no one understands what you’re going through or lose interest in maintaining relationships with others.
  • Sense of loss. It may be difficult to accept changes in your abilities.

If these feelings linger week after week, you may be dealing with depression or anxiety. Feeling depressed or anxious about your diagnosis is common, but both can be successfully treated.

Taking care of your emotional needs

Coming to terms with your diagnosis and the emotions you are feeling will help you accept your diagnosis, move forward, and discover new ways to live a positive and fulfilling life.

You are the only person who can change how you feel about your diagnosis. So it’s important to find healthy ways to deal with your emotions. This can be difficult at the beginning. But once you make the commitment to take care of your emotional needs, you may find that you can rise to the challenge and face your diagnosis. This is a new phase of your life, and you can choose to experience it with sense of connection to your emotional health.

When working through your feelings, try a combination of approaches. The following tips may be helpful:

    • Write down your thoughts and feelings about your diagnosis in a journal.
    • You may find your friends and family struggling with your diagnosis and their feelings. Learn more about how you can help family and friends.
    • Share your feelings with close family and friends. Speak open and honestly about your feelings.
    • Surround yourself with a good support system that includes individuals who are also living in the early stage of the disease and understand what you’re going through. Join our ALZConnected message boards or learn more about support programs.
    • Join an early-stage support group. It can provide you with a safe and supportive environment of peers. To find a support group in your area, check with your local Alzheimer’s Association chapter.
    • Talk to your doctor if you or others are concerned about your emotional well-being. Your doctor can determine the most appropriate treatment plan to address your concerns.
    • Seek help from a counselor or clergy member. He or she can help you to see things in a new way and help you understand more fully what you are feeling.
    • If you are feeling misunderstood or stereotyped because of your diagnosis, learn what you can do to overcome stigma.
    • Stay engaged. Continue to do the activities you enjoy for as long as you are able.
    • Take the time you need to feel sad, mourn and grieve.
    • No two people deal with their diagnosis in exactly the same way. There is no right approach. Some days may be more difficult than others, but don’t be discouraged. Learn coping tips to help you manage challenges.

You are not alone

A diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease can leave you feeling disconnected, isolated or abandoned from others. You may feel unsure of where to turn and that no one can possibly understand what you’re going through. People living with early-stage Alzheimer’s have stated that one of the most important lessons they learned early on in their diagnosis is this: they could not just wait for others to help them – they had to go out and help themselves to the best of their ability.

Whenever facing difficult times, having a good support network you can turn to for advice and encouragement may help you feel socially connected and give you a sense of belonging and purpose. Make sure your network includes other people who are living in the early stage of the disease. Connecting with others like you may help put your own experiences living with the disease in perspective, and provide you with the support and encouragement necessary to move beyond your diagnosis.

Questions for your doctor

After receiving your diagnosis, it’s normal to leave your doctor’s office unsure of what questions to ask. You just received life-changing news, and you need time to absorb this information and understand what it means for you and your family.

Your doctor is an important member of your care team. Use the opportunity to ask your doctor questions about your diagnosis, all the available options, and the benefits and risks of each choice you make.

You may be asking: “How do I know what to ask my doctor?”

Members of our Alzheimer’s Association National Early-Stage Advisory Group have shared their own experiences and questions they wish they had asked their doctors. You may find this information helpful as you develop your own list of questions.

Download these questions and others as a PDF

Example questions:

The diagnosis of Alzheimer’s disease

  1. What test(s) or tools did you use to determine my diagnosis?
  2. What are you measuring with the tests you performed?

Alzheimer’s disease

  1. How will the disease progress?
  2. What can I expect in the future?

Treatments

  1. What treatment options are available?
  2. Which symptoms are being targeting by each medication?

Clinical trials

  1. What clinical trials are available?
  2. Where can I find published information about clinical treatment studies?

Care team

  1. How familiar are you with Alzheimer’s disease? Will you be managing my care going forward?
  2. If I need to be hospitalized, will you be able to provide care in this setting?

Care and support

  1. What resources are available to help me learn more about my diagnosis? My family?
  2. What support services are available to help me live well with the disease, for as long as possible?

Source: alz.org

Create Your All-Star Care Team in 5 Steps

Create Your All-Star Care Team in 5 StepsIn this country, there is a growing problem regarding a lack of supportive resources for family caregivers. There are government programs, charities, and nonprofits that might be able to help intermittently, but what caregivers often need most is sound advice, regular respite and an extra set of hands.

 Friends may scatter when one begins caring for a spouse or parent, and not everyone has siblings or other family members they can depend on to share the load. It is crucial for each caregiver to take inventory of their personal supports in order to utilize their help as efficiently as possible. A carefully selected care team is a necessary complement to a loved one’s plan of care. Use these five steps to build your team.

 Step 1: Draft a List of Prospective Team Members

Write down the name of each family member, friend or neighbor that you interact with on a regular basis. Forego any initial judgements or doubts about their usefulness in your care plan. You want to avoid limiting any potential sources of assistance from the very beginning, so just let the ideas flow.

Step 2: Assess Each Individual’s Strengths

Now is the time to assess the strong suit of each person on your list. Is your best friend financially savvy? Can your cousin listen to you vent without interrupting or casting judgement? Does your neighbor offer to keep an eye on Mom when she’s tinkering outside in the garden? Each of these people has specific talents or capabilities that can help you execute your care plan, and most have something to contribute, whether big or small. However, be sure to factor in each person’s attitude before asking them to join your team. Your sister may have plenty of free time to drive Dad to and from doctor’s appointments, but if she brings negativity or criticism to your regular routine, then the drawbacks may outweigh the benefits of her involvement.

Step 3: Create Your All-Star Care Team

Revise your remaining list to create a foolproof roster of people who will assist you with hands-on care and day-to-day tasks. Do not include anyone who may make your duties more difficult. This is your go-to tool for getting outside help, whether it is planned well in advance or needed at the last minute. Include each person’s contact information and, if possible, an outline of their weekly schedule. This will help you quickly reference when a team member is available to pitch in.

Step 4: Assign Roles for Each Member

Once you have narrowed down your list to reliable, positive individuals, identify specific tasks in your care plan that would be a good fit for each one. Friends and family often wish they could help, but they are usually unsure of what would be useful to contribute. Individuals who have never walked in a caregiver’s shoes tend to have a difficult time understanding all of the responsibilities that are involved.

It is best for caregivers to be very specific about the kinds of assistance they would appreciate. For example, if your son lives nearby, ask if he can tend to yardwork or any home maintenance projects once or twice a month. If you struggle to prepare dinner on Wednesdays (your busiest day of the week), see if Mom’s friend from church can pick her up for a weekly dinner date. The goal of creating this team is to be able to meet your loved one’s needs (as well as your own) without every single responsibility falling solely on your shoulders. A care plan that lacks meaningful support and respite time is not viable over the long term.

Step 5: Add Some Pros to Your Team

Relatives and friends aren’t the only ones to recruit for your care team. You may feel most comfortable with these people helping out because you know them personally, but remember that not everyone has the personality, time or resources to be even a part-time caregiver. Fortunately, there are a number of professionals who can facilitate the technical aspects of providing care. A financial planner can assist with complicated fiscal decisions, an elder law attorney can ensure that you and your loved one are legally prepared for the future, and a geriatric care manager can coordinate the care your loved one deserves. A social worker or advisor at your local Area Agency on Aging (AAA) can help you find and apply for federal, state and local resources that can assist you in your caregiving duties.

 Any remaining gaps in your care plan can be filled by paid caregivers and other services. For example, in-home care and adult day care services can provide supervision and stimulation for your loved one when you need to run errands, attend your own doctor’s appointments, enjoy some respite time or go to work. If housekeeping rarely fits into your daily or weekly routine, then hire a cleaning service or arrange to have these tasks added to your home care professional’s responsibilities. Healthy meal delivery, pre-sorted prescription medications, and transportation services are some other options that can simplify your schedule and reduce your workload.

A comprehensive team assists with daily duties and can provide valuable back-up care in instances when the primary caregiver cannot see to their responsibilities. The more support a caregiver has, the less likely they are to experience burnout and the more sustainable the care plan will be.

Who Should Join Your Care Team?

  • Family and Friends
    • Siblings
    • Significant Other
    • Adult Children
    • Close Friends
    • Neighbors
    • Members of Local Community or Religious Groups
    • Grandchildren
  • Professionals
    • Physicians (Primary Care and Specialists)
    • Elder Law Attorneys
    • Geriatric Care Managers
    • Social Workers
    • Financial Advisors
    • Pharmacists
    • Home Care Agencies and Professional Caregivers
    • Adult Day Care Centers
    • Charities, Organizations and Support Programs
    • VA, Medicare and/or Medicaid Advisor(s)

Source: AgingCare.com

Can this eye scan detect Alzheimer’s years in advance?

Can this eye scan detect Alzheimer's years in advance?Researchers say early indicators of Alzheimer’s disease exist within our eyes, meaning a non-invasive eye scan could tip us off to Alzheimer’s years before symptoms occur.

It turns out the disease affects the retina — the back of the eye — similarly to how it affects the brain, notes neuroscience investigators at Cedars-Sinai Medical Center in California. Through a high-definition eye scan, the researchers found they could see buildup of toxic proteins, which are indicative of Alzheimer’s.

“The findings suggest that the retina may serve as a reliable source for Alzheimer’s disease diagnosis,” said Cedars-Sinai associate professor Maya Koronyo-Hamaoui, lead author of the study, which published Thursday in the journal JCI Insight. “One of the major advantages of analyzing the retina is the repeatability, which allows us to monitor patients and potentially the progression of their disease.”

The Alzheimer’s Association reports about 5 million Americans live with the disease, a number expected to increase to 16 million by 2050. Alzheimer’s disease is the sixth-leading cause of death in the United States.

Cedars-Sinai called the finding, “a major advancement” in sniffing out the disease earlier. Expensive and invasive brain scans have been the norm in recent years and for decades diagnosis came only by looking at a brain after a person died.

“Our hope is that eventually the investigational eye scan will be used as a screening device to detect the disease early enough to intervene and change the course of the disorder with medications and lifestyle changes,” said Keith L. Black, co-leader of the study and chair of the Cedars-Sinai Department of Neurosurgery.

In another find, the study uncovered plaques in unchecked regions of the retina, said research associate Yosef Koronyo. The amount of plaque in the retine matched the plaque in certain parts of the brain.

“Now we know exactly where to look to find the signs of Alzheimer’s disease as early as possible,” he said.

Source: USA Today

Anosognosia: When Dementia Patients Can’t Recognize Their Impairment

Anosognosia: When Dementia Patients Can’t Recognize Their ImpairmentOne of the most common questions in the AgingCare.com Alzheimer’s and Dementia Support Group pertains to how aware dementia patients are of their cognitive status. This can pose a bit of a dilemma, because with reduced mental function, there also comes a limited capacity for insight into and acknowledgement of their true condition.

Anosognosia Is Not Denial

Known as anosognosia, this phenomenon differs from the shock and denial that many individuals and families experience following an initial diagnosis. The word anosognosia is composed of three Greek roots, which combine to mean “without knowledge of disease.” Changes in the brain cause individuals with mental illness, brain tumors, stroke, Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia to believe that there is nothing wrong with them.

A loved one’s lack of awareness of their impairment can be selective or complete, and it can pertain to their memory, general thinking skills, emotions and physical abilities. A dementia patient may experience occasional difficulty with language skills, like word-finding and vocabulary, but they may explain away these situations with a general excuse about forgetfulness or fatigue. Someone who has anosognosia regarding short-term memory problems, like forgetting to bathe, missing appointments, or leaving food on the stove, will typically insist that they do not need help and are fully capable of performing daily activities independently despite clear evidence to the contrary. They may also react with anger when reminded of their mental impairment, which they are fully convinced does not actually exist.

Caregiving and Anosognosia

For dementia caregivers, anosognosia can be more frustrating to deal with than a loved one’s actual lapses in memory. A senior’s abilities are changing before your eyes, but how can you convey that they are incapable of driving, cooking or handling their finances when they don’t understand they are ill? As with most unusual dementia behaviors, learning more about the issue can help you stay calm and find workarounds.

“My mother has anosognosia—something I didn’t even know existed until I read an article about it a couple of years ago. Just knowing that she lacks the capability to recognize her deficits does make it easier to work with her sometimes because I can strategize with that in mind.” –caregiverforum1

Some patients are so convinced they’re healthy that they may even refuse medical evaluations, treatments and medications. We are all familiar with the phrase you can’t help those that won’t help themselves. But with dementia, even when someone does not acknowledge the root of their problems or want assistance, intervention of some kind is usually necessary.

Visit the articles below for insights and suggestions from experienced caregivers on how to cope with the complications and lack of awareness that result from anosognosia.

Source: AgingCare.com

Stages of Alzheimer’s

Alzhiemer'sAlzheimer’s disease typically progresses slowly in three general stages — mild (early-stage), moderate (middle-stage), and severe (late-stage). Since Alzheimer’s affects people in different ways, each person will experience symptoms – or progress through Alzheimer’s stages – differently.

Overview of disease progression

The symptoms of Alzheimer’s disease worsen over time, although the rate at which the disease progresses varies. On average, a person with Alzheimer’s lives four to eight years after diagnosis, but can live as long as 20 years, depending on other factors.

Changes in the brain related to Alzheimer’s begin years before any signs of the disease. This time period, which can last for years, is referred to as preclinical Alzheimer’s disease.

The stages below provide an overall idea of how abilities change once symptoms appear and should only be used as a general guide. They are separated into three different categories: mild Alzheimer’s disease, moderate Alzheimer’s disease and severe Alzheimer’s disease. Be aware that it may be difficult to place a person with Alzheimer’s in a specific stage as stages may overlap.

Mild Alzheimer’s disease (early-stage)

In the early stages of Alzheimer’s, a person may function independently. He or she may still drive, work and be part of social activities. Despite this, the person may feel as if he or she is having memory lapses, such as forgetting familiar words or the location of everyday objects.

Friends, family or neighbors begin to notice difficulties. During a detailed medical interview, doctors may be able to detect problems in memory or concentration. Common difficulties include:

  • Problems coming up with the right word or name
  • Trouble remembering names when introduced to new people
  • Having greater difficulty performing tasks in social or work settings
  • Forgetting material that one has just read
  • Losing or misplacing a valuable object
  • Increasing trouble with planning or organizing

Moderate Alzheimer’s disease (middle-stage)

Moderate Alzheimer’s is typically the longest stage and can last for many years. As the disease progresses, the person with Alzheimer’s will require a greater level of care.

You may notice the person with Alzheimer’s confusing words, getting frustrated or angry, or acting in unexpected ways, such as refusing to bathe. Damage to nerve cells in the brain can make it difficult to express thoughts and perform routine tasks.

At this point, symptoms will be noticeable to others and may include:

  • Forgetfulness of events or about one’s own personal history
  • Feeling moody or withdrawn, especially in socially or mentally challenging situations
  • Being unable to recall their own address or telephone number or the high school or college from which they graduated
  • Confusion about where they are or what day it is
  • The need for help choosing proper clothing for the season or the occasion
  • Trouble controlling bladder and bowels in some individuals
  • Changes in sleep patterns, such as sleeping during the day and becoming restless at night
  • An increased risk of wandering and becoming lost
  • Personality and behavioral changes, including suspiciousness and delusions or compulsive, repetitive behavior like hand-wringing or tissue shredding

Severe Alzheimer’s disease (late-stage)

In the final stage of this disease, individuals lose the ability to respond to their environment, to carry on a conversation and, eventually, to control movement. They may still say words or phrases, but communicating pain becomes difficult. As memory and cognitive skills continue to worsen, personality changes may take place and individuals need extensive help with daily activities.

At this stage, individuals may:

  • Require full-time, around-the-clock assistance with daily personal care
  • Lose awareness of recent experiences as well as of their surroundings
  • Require high levels of assistance with daily activities and personal care
  • Experience changes in physical abilities, including the ability to walk, sit and, eventually, swallow
  • Have increasing difficulty communicating
  • Become vulnerable to infections, especially pneumonia

 

Source: Alz.org

Maple Syrup Fights Alzheimer’s

Maple syrup isn’t just delicious, it also could cure Alzheimer’s disease

It’s a sweet new health discovery: Maple syrup could cure Alzheimer’s disease.Maple Syrup Alzheimer's

The delicious pancake topping may soon find its way into granny’s pill bottle because it stops brain cell damage that causes the disease, scientists revealed Monday.

The tasty treat may prevent the clumping and “misfolding” of brain cell proteins — which build up and cause plaques that trigger the devastating disease, researchers at the American Chemical Society said.

An extract of the sticky stuff stopped the dangerous “folding” in two types of brain proteins, researchers from the Krembil Research Institute of the University of Toronto said.

“Natural food products such as green tea, red wine, berries, curcumin and pomegranates continue to be studied for their potential benefits in combating Alzheimer’s disease,” said symposium director Dr. Navindra Seeram.

“And now, in preliminary laboratory-based Alzheimer’s disease studies, phenolic-enriched extracts of maple syrup from Canada showed neuroprotective effects, similar to resveratrol, a compound found in red wine,” she said.

Researchers plan to study whether a maple syrup extract can be effective as a cure for degenerative brain disease.

The syrup protects two brain proteins — beta amyloid and tau peptide, researchers said.

Researchers from the American Chemical Society discussed the discovery at an annual symposium, which is being held March 13-17 in San Diego.

Dr. Donald Weaver of the Krembil Research Institute revealed the discovery.

 

Source: New York Post, March 17, 2016