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Senior Volunteers Give from the Heart Wordfind

Serving as a volunteer is a way more and more older adults are giving back to their community and their nation. And volunteering offers many health benefits!

Give your brain a workout with this month’s puzzle, which contains 20 words all having to do with locating volunteer opportunities that are a great fit for your skills and interests. Click here to download and print the puzzle.

Need a little help? Click here for the solution to the puzzle.

Copyright © IlluminAge AgeWise, 2015

How Much Do You Know About Heart Health?

The American Heart Association recently reported that the death rate from cardiovascular disease has fallen more than 30 percent over the last decade, due to better treatment for heart attack, congestive heart failure and other heart disease. But this care comes at a cost: expenditures for the care for heart disease rose to more than $315 billion during the same decade. And heart disease continues to be the number one killer in the U.S. Every 39 seconds, someone dies of cardiovascular disease.

Education is the first step to lowering the risk of heart disease. Start by taking this short quiz to see how much you know about taking care of your heart. (Answers appear below.)

True or False?

  1. The heart is a muscle.
  2. Many diseases and conditions can contribute to the risk of heart disease.
  3. A heart attack always begins with sharp chest pain.
  4. The best thing to do if you experience heart attack symptoms is to call 911 right away.
  5. Women need to worry more about breast cancer than about heart disease.
  6. Quitting smoking is one of the best things you can do for your heart.
  7. If you have a family history of heart disease, you have exactly the same risk yourself.
  8. High blood cholesterol is one of the top risk factors for heart attack.
  9. As we grow older, it’s best to rest as much as possible.
  10. Even a person who has suffered a heart attack should exercise.
  11. It’s possible to eat a “heart smart” diet even if you dine out often.
  12. Emotional stress and anxiety can worsen a heart condition.

Answers to “Test Your Heart Health IQ”:

  1. The heart is a muscle.
    TRUE—The heart is the hardest working muscle in the body, pumping enough blood in your lifetime to fill a supertanker!
  2. Many diseases and conditions can contribute to the risk of heart disease.
    TRUE—A number of conditionsincluding hypertension (high blood pressure), high cholesterol and diabetes increase the risk of heart disease.
  3. A heart attack always begins with sharp chest pain.
    FALSE—A heart attack can begin slowly, with subtle signals. Symptoms can include:
    •    a feeling of pressure or discomfort in the chest
    •    discomfort in the arms, neck, back, jaw or stomach
    •    shortness of breath
    •    nausea, dizziness, sweating for no reason
    •    fatigue and lack of energy
  4. The best thing to do if you experience heart attack symptoms is to call 911 right away.
    TRUE—“Better safe than sorry” is very true when it comes to heart attack. Excellent treatments are now available, and the sooner treatment begins, the better the chance of saving the patient’s life and preventing disability. If you experience chest pain, especially if associated with any other of the signs listed above, call 911 right away. Acting quickly can save your life.
  5. Women need to worry more about breast cancer than about heart disease.
    FALSE—Women are far more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than from breast cancer. It is a myth that heart disease is primarily a men’s health problem. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women—and more women than men die within one year of a heart attack.
  6. Quitting smoking is one of the best things you can do for your heart.
    TRUE—Smoking is one of the top risk factors for heart disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), cigarette smokers are up to four times more likely to develop heart disease. And even if you don’t smoke, exposure to secondhand smoke may raise your risk by up to 30%.
  7. If you have a family history of heart disease, you have exactly the same risk yourself.
    FALSE—Although your risk increases if a family member was diagnosed with heart disease, it’s not all in the genes! A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk. Obesity and inactivity are greater risk factors than genetic inheritance for most people. Here are the steps to take to lower the risk:
    •    If you smoke, quit.
    •    Take steps to lower blood pressure and cholesterol level.
    •    Increase physical activity.
    •    Maintain a healthy weight.
    •    If you are diabetic, follow your care plan.
  8. High blood cholesterol is one of the top risk factors for heart attack.
    TRUE—Lowering your cholesterol level through diet and lifestyle changes (and in some cases, medication) can cut your risk.
  9. As we grow older, it’s best to rest as much as possible.
    FALSE—The older you are, the more important regular physical exercise is to your well-being. Inactivity can lead to a downward spiral of decline. Ask your healthcare provider about an exercise program that’s right for you.
  10. Even a person who has suffered a heart attack should exercise.
    TRUE—For most patients, preventing another heart attack will include a cardiac rehabilitation program. Be sure you discuss your workout regimen with your healthcare provider and follow his or her instructions.
  11. It’s possible to eat a “heart smart” diet even if you dine out often.
    TRUE—Most menus feature at least a few low-fat, low-cholesterol, low-sodium items. Avoid fried foods, instead selecting baked or broiled. (If you aren’t sure how a dish is prepared, ask your server.) Skip dessert, and order your salad with low-fat dressing served on the side.
  12. Emotional stress and anxiety can worsen a heart condition.
    TRUE—Stressful emotions can raise your blood pressure, causing your heart to work harder. Lifestyle changes and relaxation techniques help lessen the effects of stress.

This article is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor. Speak to your healthcare provider if you have questions about heart health or heart disease.

Source: IlluminAge AgeWise, 2015

 

Retirement Communities Encouraged to Promote Muscle-Strengthening Activities

A University of Missouri expert encourages staff and administrators to include a well-rounded fitness program in order to keep residents healthier.

The majority of adults aged 65 and older remain inactive and fail to meet recommended physical activity guidelines, previous research has shown. However, these studies have not represented elders living in retirement communities who may have more access to recreational activities and exercise equipment. Now, researchers at the University of Missouri have found that older adults in retirement communities who reported more exercise experienced less physical decline than their peers who reported less exercise, although many adults—even those who exercised—did not complete muscle-strengthening exercises, which are another defense against physical decline.

“Physical decline is natural in this age group, but we found that people who exercised more declined less,” said Lorraine Phillips, an associate professor in the University of Missouri Sinclair School of Nursing. “The most popular physical activities the residents of the retirement community reported doing were light housework and walking, both of which are easily integrated into individuals’ daily lives, but these exercises are not the best choices for maintaining muscle strength.”

Phillips and her colleagues studied the physical activity of 38 residents at TigerPlace, an independent living community in Columbia, four times in one year. The researchers tested the residents’ walking speed, balance and their ability to stand up after sitting in a chair. Then, researchers compared the results of the tests to the residents’ self-reported participation in exercise. Phillips found that residents who reported doing more exercise had more success maintaining their physical abilities over time.

Phillips says the national recommendations for exercise include muscle strengthening exercises, such as knee extensions and bicep curls. Most of the study participants did not report completing these types of activities despite daily opportunities for recreational activities and access to exercise equipment. Phillips says muscle strength is important to individuals of this age group in order for them to maintain their ability to conduct everyday activities such as opening jars, standing up from chairs and supporting their own body weight.

“For older individuals, walking may represent the most familiar and comfortable type of physical activity,” Phillips said. “Muscle-strengthening exercises should be promoted more aggressively in retirement communities and made more appealing to residents.”

To combat the lack of physical activity among seniors, Phillips says health care providers should discuss exercise programs with their patients and share the possible risks associated with their lack of exercise, such as losing their ability to live independently. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, individuals 65 years of age and older that have no limiting health conditions should do muscle-strengthening activities that work all major muscle groups at least two days a week.

Phillips’ research, “Retirement Community Residents’ Physical Activity, Depressive Symptoms, and Functional Limitations,” was published in Clinical Nursing Researchhttp://cnr.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/02/10/1054773813508133.abstract

Source: University of Missouri News Bureau.

 

Healthy Lifestyle Choices to Reduce the Risk of Heart Disease

Most of us know that we can take “heart smart” steps to promote cardiac wellness. But sometimes, even the researchers are amazed at what a difference these lifestyle choices can make.

The American College of Cardiology recently reported on a new study, this one on a group of over 20,000 healthy Swedish men aged 45–79. The researchers from Karolinska Instituet in Stockholm, Sweden studied the men for 11 years, questioning them regularly about their diet, exercise and other wellness factors.

Said study author Agneta Akesson, Ph.D., “It is not surprising that healthy lifestyle choices would lead to a reduction in heart attacks. What is surprising is how drastically the risk dropped due to these factors.”

The researchers found that each healthy lifestyle factor decreased the risk of coronary heart disease. The healthy choices include:

  • A healthy diet including fruits, vegetables, legumes, nuts, reduced-fat dairy products, whole grains and fish
  • Not smoking
  • Walking or cycling at least 40 minutes per day
  • Amount of belly fat under 95 centimeters (37.5 inches)
  • Moderating alcohol consumption

According to the study authors, these preventive choices also help patients avoid the potential side effects of heart medications and, as a side benefit, save patients and the healthcare system money.

Akesson and her team report that, at present, less than 2 percent of the American population follow all these recommendations.

February’s American Heart Month is a great time to make some heart-smart resolutions for ourselves, and to promote heart health for everyone. This is not just an issue for seniors. Says Akesson, “It is important to note that these lifestyle behaviors are modifiable, and changing from high-risk to low-risk behaviors can have great impact on cardiovascular health. However, the best thing one can do is to adapt healthy lifestyle choices early in life.”

Learn More

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) offers resources and information for American Heart Month.  http://www.cdc.gov/features/heartmonth

Source: IlluminAge AgeWise reporting on information from the American College of Cardiology. Read the entire study in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology  http://content.onlinejacc.org/article.aspx?articleID=1909605

 

Leading Physician Group Releases Guidance for Treatment of Urinary Incontinence

It’s a subject few people openly discuss—yet millions of senior American women are living with urinary incontinence (UI), a troublesome problem that if not managed, can lead to infection, isolation, falls, inactivity and an overall decline in health. Many of these women and their families fail to realize that UI can be treated, often without surgery.

The American College of Physicians (ACP) recently reported that each year, treatment for UI costs upwards of $19.5 billion. In September 2014, the organization released updated, evidence-based recommendations for non-surgical treatment options “to help doctors and patients understand the benefits, harms, and costs of tests and treatment options so they can pursue care together that improves health, avoids harms, and eliminates wasteful practices.”

Treatment recommendations depend on the type of incontinence a woman is experiencing:

Stress incontinence means that urine leaks from the bladder when a woman laughs, coughs, exercises or lifts something heavy. It is caused by physical changes in the muscles of the pelvic floor caused by factors such as childbirth, menopause and obesity. This type is most common in women. For this type, the ACP recommends a specific series of exercises of the pelvic floor called Kegel exercises.

Urgency incontinence, sometimes called “overactive bladder,” happens when the bladder begins to empty itself suddenly, perhaps when the patient thinks about going to the bathroom or hears running water. It can be caused by damage to the nerves or by irritation from infection or certain foods. For urgency incontinence, the ACP is recommending “bladder training, a form of behavioral therapy that involves urinating on a set schedule and gradually increasing the time between urination.” If bladder training is unsuccessful, the ACP recommends medication as recommended by the patient’s physician.

Mixed UI is a combination of stress and urgency incontinence. For this type, the ACP recommends Kegel exercises with bladder training. They also recommend weight loss and exercise for women who are obese.

ACP president Dr. David Fleming states that about half the women who experience this problem don’t even report it to their healthcare provider. He says to doctors, “Urinary incontinence is a common problem for women that is often under-reported and under-diagnosed. Physicians should take an active approach and ask specific questions such as onset, symptoms and frequency of urinary incontinence.”

The information in this article is not meant to replace the advice of your doctor. If you are experiencing incontinence, seek the advice of your healthcare provider.

Source: AgeWise reporting on material from the American College of Physicians. You can read the entire “Nonsurgical Management of Urinary Incontinence in Women” set of guidelines in the Sept. 16, 2014 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine [link to: http://annals.org/article.aspx?articleid=1905131]

 

Can Weight Loss Improve Problems with Incontinence?

Can weight loss improve problems with urinary incontinence?  It may, according the American Institute for Cancer Research expert Karen Collins.

Urinary incontinence is an involuntary leakage of urine. It can occur as stress incontinence (which comes at a time of some form of exertion or when sneezing or coughing), urge incontinence (which occurs with or immediately following a sense of urgency), or a mixture of both. Excess body fat, especially in the abdominal area, is strongly linked to greater risk of urinary incontinence. Researchers say this could be a physical effect, due to pressure of excess fat pushing down and stressing the pelvic floor.

However, since studies also show that fat tissue is metabolically active and linked to inflammation and hormonal changes, it’s possible that these conditions are involved in the link between overweight and urinary incontinence. A recent review pulling together the results of six studies on this link concluded that modest weight loss may help reduce urinary incontinence. The good news is that a 5 to 10 percent weight loss seemed to make a difference, which could mean losing less than 10 pounds for some people.

However, excess weight is far from the only reason for urinary incontinence. It can be related to medications, hormone changes, surgery, childbirth and other causes. It’s unfortunate that many people who experience urinary incontinence are embarrassed and don’t discuss it with their healthcare provider. That is a shame, because in addition to weight loss, other remedies can also be considered. If you are overweight, modest weight loss also can make a difference in controlling or reducing risk of so many other health problems, including Type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. Making a few changes in eating habits and activity to support a modest weight loss is a good idea. But don’t leave your doctor or other healthcare provider in the dark as you face this problem.

Source: Karen Collins, MS, RDN, CDN, FAND, of the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). The AICR is the cancer charity that fosters research on the relationship of nutrition, physical activity and weight management to cancer risk, interprets the scientific literature and educates the public about the results. Visit the AICR website (www.aicr.org) to find a wide variety of consumer information on healthy diet.

Move Into Spring With Your Best Back Yet

As warm weather finally stretches across the country, outdoor physical activity enthusiasts of all ages will be swinging clubs and racquets, lacing up sneakers or walking shoes and brushing off gardening tools to make the most of the season.

If you’re returning to these activities after a long cold winter, or perhaps haven’t had the chance to enjoy the benefits of sunshine and higher temperatures lately, the National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) has issued some timely tips to help you take care of your back, ensure a healthy start to spring and reduce the risk of injury.

Back pain affects nearly 10 million Americans each year. Maintaining proper posture, balance, strength and flexibility can all help to increase core strength and, in turn, support the back.

NATA board member Kathy Dieringer, EdD, ATC, suggests starting with good health habits, including attention to diet and exercise, maintaining a good weight, and refraining from smoking. “All these elements can preserve a good back, keep our bones and bodies strong and help the body heal should injury occur,” she says.

Best Bets for Back Care: Be Good to Your Back

Start with good posture: Maintain good posture in day-to-day activities and while exercising. Keep your shoulders back when sitting, avoid slouching and don’t sit for more than 30 minutes without moving around.

Be smart about shoes: Also be aware of what you are wearing on your feet. Though high heels are very fashionable, good back health depends on appropriate footwear, especially if you are active.

Strengthen the core: Strengthen your core to maintain good back health and improve your balance. Crunches, modified crunches with weights or medicine balls, planks, bridges, and back extensions, among other exercises, will improve your core. Ask your athletic trainer or other medical expert to review appropriate form for best results.

Practice proper lifting techniques: Lift with your legs, bend at the knees and keep your back straight, advises Dieringer. The strength from the legs will provide added power—whether for sports participation or household activities like lifting a laundry basket or even picking up children or pets. Minimize twisting, especially when carrying something. To minimize torque on the spine, turn the body instead and keep hips and shoulders facing the same direction.

Care for the whole back (upper and lower): Make sure to incorporate upper and lower back muscles as a part of your weight room workout or during regular physical activity.

Minimize static bending or stooping positions: If movement causes you to bend over or stoop, take frequent breaks and extend your back when you stand up. With spring here and gardening and other outdoor activities planned, the rest breaks and stretching will help maintain flexibility and mobility.

Keep moving: Couch potatoes, get up! The best thing you can do for your back is to maintain mobility. Walking is an outstanding activity for good back health.

Support your back when sitting or sleeping: Sit with knees slightly bent and higher than your hips. When sleeping, maintain your lumbar curves whenever possible, using pillows if necessary.

Maintain back flexibility: Use movement and extension exercises to maintain proper back flexibility. Press-ups or standing back extensions are both good exercises.

If your back is giving you pain signals, pay attention, says Dieringer. Radiating pain from your spine into your thigh and/or down to your foot should not be ignored. While this symptom has a few possible causes, it should be addressed quickly. Stop your activity and rest. Be sure to consult your physician on how to proceed. Ignoring back pain can lead to complications.

“By following a healthy regimen to maintain good posture, proper back and body mechanics, your movements should be easy, pain-free and with great range of motion,” concludes Dieringer. “These tips will ensure you’re ready to enjoy physical activities throughout spring and the seasons ahead.”

Source: The National Athletic Trainers’ Association (NATA) represents and supports members of the athletic training profession. Athletic trainers are health care professionals who specialize in the prevention, diagnosis, treatment and rehabilitation of injuries and sport-related illnesses. Visit the NATA website (http://www.nata.org) to learn more about this profession.

 

 

Home Care Supports Arthritis Patients and Their Families

Professional home care services help senior clients manage arthritis in several important ways:

Assistance with the activities of daily living. Mobility limitations and painful joints make it hard to do some of the daily tasks most of us take for granted. A home care professional can assist with housekeeping, transportation, laundry, personal care, and meal preparation, including special diets.

Encouragement and confidence to support activity. With a home caregiver present, clients feel more secure engaging in the recommended activity program, whether it is a formal exercise program, a walk around the block, chair exercises or gardening.

Transportation to healthcare appointments and prescribed activities. Not all home care happens at home! If transportation is a challenge, the home care worker can take the client to doctor’s appointments, exercise classes, or physical therapy.

Medication management. It is very important for arthritis patients to take medications at the right time, and in the correct way. Depending on the type of caregiver and state regulations, home care workers can provide medication reminders, take clients to the pharmacy or pick up prescriptions, help organize medications, and report any side effects.

Fall protection. Arthritis is a risk factor for falls. Home caregivers can remove clutter from pathways, mop up spills promptly, perform potentially hazardous household tasks, and assist clients as they walk up or down stairs.

Care after joint replacement recovery. When a patient comes home after hip or knee replacement surgery, complying with post-surgical instructions is one of the top predictors of successful recovery. Home care helps patients comply with post-surgical instructions, such as avoiding dangerous motions that could damage the healing joint.

When arthritis compromises a senior’s mobility and quality of life, trained, professional caregivers support a client’s independence and provide welcome peace of mind for the patient and family alike.

For More Information

The Arthritis Foundation (www.arthritis.org) offers support, resources and information about more than 100 types of arthritis and related conditions.

See the website of the National Institute of Arthritis and Musculoskeletal and Skin Diseases (www.niams.nih.gov) for information and the latest updates.

The American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons (http://orthoinfo.aaos.org) provides consumer information, including a detailed discussion of different types of arthritis and treatment.

© IlluminAge AgeWise 2015

May Is Arthritis Awareness Month

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 50 million Americans are living with arthritis. It is the most common disease in people over the age of 65, and approximately half of the population of that age has some form of the disease. It affects all race and ethnic groups, and is the most common cause of disability in the U.S.

Arthritis is not a single disease, but is a group of over 100 different conditions, all of which can cause pain, swelling and an interference with normal movement. Some types of arthritis are thought to be hereditary; some result from overuse or injury of a joint, or from years of “wear and tear”; some types are caused by infection and still others are caused by a malfunction of the immune system. Arthritis may affect only one joint, or many joints at the same time. The joints most commonly affected are the weight-bearing joints, such as the hips and knees, and also the smaller joints of the hands and neck.

Although there is no cure for most types of arthritis, the pain and inflammation can be reduced by a variety of medical treatments. Appropriate treatment can often result in great improvement to a person’s condition, as well as preventing further damage. Treatment depends on the type and degree of the condition.

Analgesic and anti-inflammatory medications relieve pain and reduce inflammation, or both. Aspirin or ibuprofen are often prescribed. Alternative pain relievers such as corticosteroids, acetaminophen and topical ointments or rubs also may be prescribed, depending on the type and severity of a patient’s arthritis.

Exercise and rest are both important. People with arthritis tire more easily; the physician may also order rest of a painful joint. But it is just as important to remain active. Exercise helps strengthen the muscles surrounding affected joints, protecting them from further damage. It also increases blood flow and lubrication of joints, and helps keep the joint strong and mobile, preventing loss of function. Exercise also helps patients maintain a healthy weight; being overweight puts extra stress on joints. A physician-prescribed exercise program will usually include range-of-motion, strengthening and aerobic exercises.

Physical therapy benefits many arthritis patients and can include heat or cold treatments, whirlpool and massage, splinting to immobilize and rest a joint, and training in performing exercises to loosen and build up joints and surrounding muscles.

Occupational therapists help patients achieve the greatest level of independence possible by providing instruction in alternative ways of performing the activities of daily living and self-care. They can also evaluate a patient’s home environment to suggest any necessary adaptations, such as grab bars or a raised toilet seat.

Adaptive devices can make living with arthritis easier. Occupational therapists can instruct arthritis patients in the use of mobility aids that lessen the stress on joints, such as canes and walkers. For arthritis in the shoulder or hand, long-handled spoons, zipper pulls, built-up toothbrush handles and page turners make the activities of daily living easier.

Surgery may be recommended if arthritis is causing severe pain and lost joint function. Some surgical procedures repair or remove damaged tissue. Joint replacement is becoming more and more common, and most patients experience excellent results from an artificial hip or knee.

With Trans Fats, Foods Last Longer But Memories Don’t

You have probably read that trans fats are bad for the heart. Trans fats, also known as trans fatty acids, are created when hydrogen is added to vegetable oil to keep foods solid and to extend their shelf life. Here’s where trans fats are often found:

  • packaged baked goods, such as cookies, crackers and frozen pies
  • snack foods such as microwave popcorn
  • certain margarines
  • coffee creamer
  • refrigerated dough products
  • frozen pizza
  • fast foods

Though food manufacturers find trans fats useful, medical science says they should be avoided. Many studies have shown that trans fats raise the risk of heart disease by raising the level of “bad cholesterol” (LDL). Trans fats have been linked to cancer, diabetes and stroke, as well. Prof. Beatrice Golomb of the University of California-San Diego says it best: “As I tell patients, while trans fats increase the shelf life of foods, they reduce the shelf life of people.”

At a recent American Heart Association scientific conference, Dr. Golomb reported on a study that gives us yet another reason to avoid trans fats: they seem to damage the memory. Dr. Golomb’s team studied a group of 1,000 healthy men, and found that the higher a participant’s consumption of trans fat, the worse he performed on a word memory test. Each additional gram of trans fat consumed per day resulted in fewer words recalled. This held true across test subjects of different ages, ethnicities and education levels.

Dr. Golomb explained, “Foods have different effects on oxidative stress and cell energy.” You have probably heard of the benefits of antioxidants. Trans fats, says Golomb, are pro-oxidant, and increase oxidative stress.

The best way to avoid the damaging effect of trans fats is not to consume them at all! Read food labels carefully, and if you see trans fats in the ingredients, leave the product to live out its shelf life – on the shelf.

This article is not mean to replace the advice of your healthcare provider. Consult your doctor or nutritionist with questions about cognitive and cardiac health, and about a diet that is best for you.

Source: IlluminAge AgeWise reporting on study from the American Heart Association  http://newsroom.heart.org/news/trans-fat-consumption-is-linked-to-diminished-memory-in-working-aged-adults?preview=18b7