Posts

How Giving Thanks Can Improve Your Health

As we enter the season of thanksgiving (including The Day itself), we are told repeatedly to count our blessings and practice gratitude. Many of us stop to consider all we have to be thankful for only for a moment on the fourth Thursday of November. But does the act of giving thanks provide benefits beyond a momentary acknowledgement of the good in our lives? Can a daily practice of gratitude actually improve our health?

Many experts think so. One of the main scientists exploring the phenomenon of giving thanks is Robert Emmons, who has studied the topic extensively. His book, Thanks! How the New Science of Gratitude Can Make You Happier, chronicles the studies he’s done that have convinced him that gratitude “is literally one of the few things that can measurably change people’s lives.”

Emmons is far from alone in his enthusiasm for gratitude. Dr. Lawrence Rosen, an integrative pediatrician and founder of the Whole Child Center, is also an advocate. According to Rosen, there are at least five benefits of gratitude that have scientific studies to back them up.

  • Gratitude reduces depression.
  • Gratitude engenders a feeling of peace.
  • Gratitude aids in restful sleep.
  • Gratitude improves heart health.
  • Gratitude strengthens memory.

So, how does one practice the art of gratitude?

One of the practices that Mr. Emmons extols is the gratitude journal. Oprah Winfrey has been talking about her personal experiences with a gratitude journal for years. The goal here is to set aside some time every day and write down several things you’re grateful for. According to Emmons, the act of writing “allows you to see the meaning of events going on around you and create meaning in your own life.”

Here are some other tips to keep you on the road of practicing gratitude:

Create visual cues

The toils of daily life can make us quickly forget all we have to be grateful for. So, remind yourself every day with visual reminders. This could be a photograph, a physical token of a feel-good moment (such as a souvenir from a wonderful vacation), or even just a Post-It note listing something for which you’re grateful.

Get support

Surround yourself with people who practice gratitude on a daily basis. Hearing someone share what they’re thankful for (especially if they’re facing a challenge) will remind you of all the blessings in your own life.

Give freely of yourself

Be conscious of the “emotional wake” you leave in the word. Smile at strangers and notice their reaction. Being conscious of how your actions affect others will naturally lead to others being grateful for you, which is the one of the greatest gifts of all.

Gratitude is like any other discipline – it takes practice! It starts with being awake and aware of the world around you and the beauty that is available for all us to share.

 

How Much Do You Know About Heart Health?

The American Heart Association recently reported that the death rate from cardiovascular disease has fallen more than 30 percent over the last decade, due to better treatment for heart attack, congestive heart failure and other heart disease. But this care comes at a cost: expenditures for the care for heart disease rose to more than $315 billion during the same decade. And heart disease continues to be the number one killer in the U.S. Every 39 seconds, someone dies of cardiovascular disease.

Education is the first step to lowering the risk of heart disease. Start by taking this short quiz to see how much you know about taking care of your heart. (Answers appear below.)

True or False?

  1. The heart is a muscle.
  2. Many diseases and conditions can contribute to the risk of heart disease.
  3. A heart attack always begins with sharp chest pain.
  4. The best thing to do if you experience heart attack symptoms is to call 911 right away.
  5. Women need to worry more about breast cancer than about heart disease.
  6. Quitting smoking is one of the best things you can do for your heart.
  7. If you have a family history of heart disease, you have exactly the same risk yourself.
  8. High blood cholesterol is one of the top risk factors for heart attack.
  9. As we grow older, it’s best to rest as much as possible.
  10. Even a person who has suffered a heart attack should exercise.
  11. It’s possible to eat a “heart smart” diet even if you dine out often.
  12. Emotional stress and anxiety can worsen a heart condition.

Answers to “Test Your Heart Health IQ”:

  1. The heart is a muscle.
    TRUE—The heart is the hardest working muscle in the body, pumping enough blood in your lifetime to fill a supertanker!
  2. Many diseases and conditions can contribute to the risk of heart disease.
    TRUE—A number of conditionsincluding hypertension (high blood pressure), high cholesterol and diabetes increase the risk of heart disease.
  3. A heart attack always begins with sharp chest pain.
    FALSE—A heart attack can begin slowly, with subtle signals. Symptoms can include:
    •    a feeling of pressure or discomfort in the chest
    •    discomfort in the arms, neck, back, jaw or stomach
    •    shortness of breath
    •    nausea, dizziness, sweating for no reason
    •    fatigue and lack of energy
  4. The best thing to do if you experience heart attack symptoms is to call 911 right away.
    TRUE—“Better safe than sorry” is very true when it comes to heart attack. Excellent treatments are now available, and the sooner treatment begins, the better the chance of saving the patient’s life and preventing disability. If you experience chest pain, especially if associated with any other of the signs listed above, call 911 right away. Acting quickly can save your life.
  5. Women need to worry more about breast cancer than about heart disease.
    FALSE—Women are far more likely to die of cardiovascular disease than from breast cancer. It is a myth that heart disease is primarily a men’s health problem. Heart disease is the leading cause of death for women—and more women than men die within one year of a heart attack.
  6. Quitting smoking is one of the best things you can do for your heart.
    TRUE—Smoking is one of the top risk factors for heart disease. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), cigarette smokers are up to four times more likely to develop heart disease. And even if you don’t smoke, exposure to secondhand smoke may raise your risk by up to 30%.
  7. If you have a family history of heart disease, you have exactly the same risk yourself.
    FALSE—Although your risk increases if a family member was diagnosed with heart disease, it’s not all in the genes! A healthy lifestyle can cut your risk. Obesity and inactivity are greater risk factors than genetic inheritance for most people. Here are the steps to take to lower the risk:
    •    If you smoke, quit.
    •    Take steps to lower blood pressure and cholesterol level.
    •    Increase physical activity.
    •    Maintain a healthy weight.
    •    If you are diabetic, follow your care plan.
  8. High blood cholesterol is one of the top risk factors for heart attack.
    TRUE—Lowering your cholesterol level through diet and lifestyle changes (and in some cases, medication) can cut your risk.
  9. As we grow older, it’s best to rest as much as possible.
    FALSE—The older you are, the more important regular physical exercise is to your well-being. Inactivity can lead to a downward spiral of decline. Ask your healthcare provider about an exercise program that’s right for you.
  10. Even a person who has suffered a heart attack should exercise.
    TRUE—For most patients, preventing another heart attack will include a cardiac rehabilitation program. Be sure you discuss your workout regimen with your healthcare provider and follow his or her instructions.
  11. It’s possible to eat a “heart smart” diet even if you dine out often.
    TRUE—Most menus feature at least a few low-fat, low-cholesterol, low-sodium items. Avoid fried foods, instead selecting baked or broiled. (If you aren’t sure how a dish is prepared, ask your server.) Skip dessert, and order your salad with low-fat dressing served on the side.
  12. Emotional stress and anxiety can worsen a heart condition.
    TRUE—Stressful emotions can raise your blood pressure, causing your heart to work harder. Lifestyle changes and relaxation techniques help lessen the effects of stress.

This article is not intended to replace the advice of your doctor. Speak to your healthcare provider if you have questions about heart health or heart disease.

Source: IlluminAge AgeWise, 2015

 

What Does Successful Aging Really Mean?

When we talk about “successful aging,” many Americans think of models in senior product advertisements who—apart from their silver hair—seem to be untouched by age as they pose on the golf course, walk on the beach or dance the night away.

But few of us retain our physical and cognitive health indefinitely. Most of us will deal with increasing disability as the years advance, and while disease and disability aren’t “a normal part of aging,” they are challenges we are likely to face. According to a recent report from the U.S. Census Bureau, nearly 40 percent of people older than 65 have at least one disability.

A researcher from University of Louisville recently urged that we reconsider our preconceptions of “successful aging.” Nursing professor Valerie Lander McCarthy, Ph.D., RN, collaborated with a visiting professor from China to develop a different definition of positive aging.

McCarthy says that it is unrealistic to measure “positive aging” solely on physical and mental capacity. She says that if they don’t fall into the 10 percent with exceptional physical and cognitive health, “older adults feel guilty when they get sick because they think they are not succeeding—and in the U.S., succeeding is important.”

McCarthy’s work with Shandong University’s Ji Hong appeared in the Journal of Transcultural Nursing. The team said, “Transcendence—a sense of meaning, well-being and life satisfaction—is the best predictor of positive aging. The concept involves relationships, creativity, contemplation, introspection and spirituality.”

McCarthy has worked with interventions to increase this type of positive aging. These include encouraging “a time for quiet solitude in natural beauty followed by a discussion about a person’s outlook, helping to develop a broadened perspective on life or a feeling of being an integral part of the cycle of life.” McCarthy says storytelling can also be beneficial.

“Successful aging is important for the rapidly growing population of older adults and their families and caregivers,” says McCarthy.  She urges more attention to interventions that promote a sense of successful aging, and reminds us:  “It is also significant for society as a whole, which will bear the burden of unprecendented demands on health and aging services.”

Source: IlluminAgeAgeWise reporting on study from University of Louisville [optional link to: http://tcn.sagepub.com/content/early/2014/05/16/1043659614526257.full.pdf?ijkey=ifzmJkLq4agorci&keytype=ref]

 

Can Seniors Fight Depression By Going on the Internet?

According to the Geriatric Mental Health Foundation, more than 6 million Americans older than 65 experience feelings of persistent sadness, hopelessness and lack of energy. Two million of these seniors have been diagnosed with a severe depressive illness.

Depression is caused by a chemical imbalance in the brain, resulting from illness, a loss or accumulated losses, chronic pain, the side effects of medication and other causes. You might be surprised to know that retirement can be the trigger event for depression. Even though most of us look forward to having our days to ourselves, with more time to do the things we want to do, retirement may create a “vocation gap” that leaves some retirees without a feeling of purpose and a place in the world. Retirement may also mean the loss of an important social context.

It’s important to seek treatment for depression. Treatment might include medications and therapy. But often, lifestyle changes provide a powerful mood boost. These include everything from exercise to volunteering to watching humorous TV programs. And over the past few years, several studies have shown that internet use can be an effective tool for reducing feelings of boredom and isolation.

This was confirmed recently when a team of researchers headed by Shelia R. Cotton, Ph.D., from Michigan State University examined results from the large Health and Retirement Study, an ongoing survey that provides data on more than 22,000 older Americans. As reported by the Gerontological Society of America, the team asked study subjects: “Do you regularly use the World Wide Web, or the internet, for sending and receiving email or for any other purpose?”

The results showed that the internet users had a 33 percent reduction in the probability of depression. Said the study authors, “This provides some evidence that the mechanism linking internet use to depression is the remediation of social isolation and loneliness. Encouraging older adults to use the internet may help decrease isolation, loneliness, and depression.”

Online socialization is a great way to supplement and increase “real life” friendships. Surfing the Web provides mental stimulation and helps seniors feel informed and connected. Something as small as watching a few cat videos—and sharing them on Facebook—can raise the spirits. And today, many young people who were raised with the internet are providing their older relatives with a little intergenerational tech support. If you or an older loved one is experiencing depression and isolation, check out the resources in your community to help seniors learn to use computers and connect with others online.

Read more about the study here.

Copyright © IlluminAge AgeWise, 2014; with excerpts from news release from the Gerontological Society of America.

 

Can Weight Loss Improve Problems with Incontinence?

Can weight loss improve problems with urinary incontinence?  It may, according the American Institute for Cancer Research expert Karen Collins.

Urinary incontinence is an involuntary leakage of urine. It can occur as stress incontinence (which comes at a time of some form of exertion or when sneezing or coughing), urge incontinence (which occurs with or immediately following a sense of urgency), or a mixture of both. Excess body fat, especially in the abdominal area, is strongly linked to greater risk of urinary incontinence. Researchers say this could be a physical effect, due to pressure of excess fat pushing down and stressing the pelvic floor.

However, since studies also show that fat tissue is metabolically active and linked to inflammation and hormonal changes, it’s possible that these conditions are involved in the link between overweight and urinary incontinence. A recent review pulling together the results of six studies on this link concluded that modest weight loss may help reduce urinary incontinence. The good news is that a 5 to 10 percent weight loss seemed to make a difference, which could mean losing less than 10 pounds for some people.

However, excess weight is far from the only reason for urinary incontinence. It can be related to medications, hormone changes, surgery, childbirth and other causes. It’s unfortunate that many people who experience urinary incontinence are embarrassed and don’t discuss it with their healthcare provider. That is a shame, because in addition to weight loss, other remedies can also be considered. If you are overweight, modest weight loss also can make a difference in controlling or reducing risk of so many other health problems, including Type 2 diabetes and high blood pressure. Making a few changes in eating habits and activity to support a modest weight loss is a good idea. But don’t leave your doctor or other healthcare provider in the dark as you face this problem.

Source: Karen Collins, MS, RDN, CDN, FAND, of the American Institute for Cancer Research (AICR). The AICR is the cancer charity that fosters research on the relationship of nutrition, physical activity and weight management to cancer risk, interprets the scientific literature and educates the public about the results. Visit the AICR website (www.aicr.org) to find a wide variety of consumer information on healthy diet.

May Is Arthritis Awareness Month

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), over 50 million Americans are living with arthritis. It is the most common disease in people over the age of 65, and approximately half of the population of that age has some form of the disease. It affects all race and ethnic groups, and is the most common cause of disability in the U.S.

Arthritis is not a single disease, but is a group of over 100 different conditions, all of which can cause pain, swelling and an interference with normal movement. Some types of arthritis are thought to be hereditary; some result from overuse or injury of a joint, or from years of “wear and tear”; some types are caused by infection and still others are caused by a malfunction of the immune system. Arthritis may affect only one joint, or many joints at the same time. The joints most commonly affected are the weight-bearing joints, such as the hips and knees, and also the smaller joints of the hands and neck.

Although there is no cure for most types of arthritis, the pain and inflammation can be reduced by a variety of medical treatments. Appropriate treatment can often result in great improvement to a person’s condition, as well as preventing further damage. Treatment depends on the type and degree of the condition.

Analgesic and anti-inflammatory medications relieve pain and reduce inflammation, or both. Aspirin or ibuprofen are often prescribed. Alternative pain relievers such as corticosteroids, acetaminophen and topical ointments or rubs also may be prescribed, depending on the type and severity of a patient’s arthritis.

Exercise and rest are both important. People with arthritis tire more easily; the physician may also order rest of a painful joint. But it is just as important to remain active. Exercise helps strengthen the muscles surrounding affected joints, protecting them from further damage. It also increases blood flow and lubrication of joints, and helps keep the joint strong and mobile, preventing loss of function. Exercise also helps patients maintain a healthy weight; being overweight puts extra stress on joints. A physician-prescribed exercise program will usually include range-of-motion, strengthening and aerobic exercises.

Physical therapy benefits many arthritis patients and can include heat or cold treatments, whirlpool and massage, splinting to immobilize and rest a joint, and training in performing exercises to loosen and build up joints and surrounding muscles.

Occupational therapists help patients achieve the greatest level of independence possible by providing instruction in alternative ways of performing the activities of daily living and self-care. They can also evaluate a patient’s home environment to suggest any necessary adaptations, such as grab bars or a raised toilet seat.

Adaptive devices can make living with arthritis easier. Occupational therapists can instruct arthritis patients in the use of mobility aids that lessen the stress on joints, such as canes and walkers. For arthritis in the shoulder or hand, long-handled spoons, zipper pulls, built-up toothbrush handles and page turners make the activities of daily living easier.

Surgery may be recommended if arthritis is causing severe pain and lost joint function. Some surgical procedures repair or remove damaged tissue. Joint replacement is becoming more and more common, and most patients experience excellent results from an artificial hip or knee.

Traveling With a Senior Loved One

Most of us have a limited amount of time and money we’re able to spend on travel. If you have parents who live far from home, the desire to spend time with them means there’s even less time for you to just run off and have a “real” vacation. Or, if you’re a caregiver looking after parents who live near you, you may feel as if you’re never able to get away due to your responsibilities.

For both groups, there’s a new solution that’s gaining popularity – traveling with your elderly parents. Of course, this comes with its own set of challenges, but many discover that a change of scenery can still provide the break they need. Many also find that traveling with their parents brings them closer together and provides opportunities to share experiences that last a lifetime.

Traveling with an aging parent does require a bit more planning. First, of course, you’ll want to consult with your parent’s physician to ensure that traveling is even an option. If the doctor gives a green light, here are some tips that can make your trip one you’ll remember (fondly) for years to come.

Make it a family affair. To share the caregiving responsibilities, invite other family members to join you. Having siblings, cousins, aunts and uncles along to share the load provides more opportunity for you to relax and enjoy yourself. As a side benefit, a family reunion provides opportunities to connect with other relatives you might not see very often.

Make sure your loved one has everything they need. Before you hit the road, make sure your loved one has all their medications and any health accessories (walker, oxygen tank, hearing aids, etc.) they need to fully experience and enjoy the trip. If you’re flying, contact the airline in advance to arrange for a wheelchair or other assistance your loved one may need. Be aware of any surgical implants that might set off a metal detector.

Pack lightly. Traveling with an elder often means helping carry their bags, making sure they have their travel documents, and ensuring they don’t wander off. With all that going on, you don’t need the added burden of too much luggage. Encourage your loved on to take only essentials – and it helps to travel to a place where it’s warm, so clothing can be light. Make sure you have anything that your loved one will need while traveling – a favorite snack, medications, a neck pillow – in a bag that can be carried onboard, if flying, or a small bag that can ride with the senior in a car or bus.

Schedule some downtime. Once you’ve reached your destination, make it a point to plan some downtime and let your loved one know that each day will include some time for a nap, or just sitting and reading a book. Setting this expectation will not only provide you with more free time, but will also give your loved one “permission” to relax as well.

Enjoy yourself. If you’re a child who doesn’t see your parent often, use this as a time to enjoy their company. Focus on your time together and recognize it as an opportunity to reconnect and grow closer. If you’re a caregiver who sees your parent every day, appreciate the change of scenery and use it as an opportunity to share life experiences that may not be as easy to do in the midst of a daily routine.

Source: IlluminAge AgeWise, 2015

April Is Stress Awareness Month

April Is Stress Awareness Month

The Federal Occupational Health website offers advice to “take time to unwind.”

Stress happens. Sometimes it’s unavoidable, at times it’s unbearable. That’s why taking time for yourself is a necessity.

Stress does not merely afflict your mind; it can also affect you on a cellular level. In fact, long-term stress can lead to a wide range of illnesses—from headaches to stomach disorders to depression—and can even increase the risk of serious conditions like stroke and heart disease. Understanding the mind/stress/health connection can help you better manage stress and improve your health and well-being.

The Fight or Flight Response

The stress response is a survival mechanism that’s “hard wired” into our nervous systems. This automatic response is necessary for mobilizing quick reflexes when there is imminent danger, such as swerving to avoid a car crash.

When you perceive a threat, stress hormones rush into your bloodstream—increasing heart rate, blood pressure, and glucose levels. Other hormones also suppress functions like digestion and the immune system, which is one of the reasons why chronic stress can leave you more vulnerable to illness.

Danger triggers the stress response. But, unfortunately, so can work conflicts, worry over debt, bad memories, or anxiety. Although one bad day won’t compromise your health, weeks or months of stress can dampen your immune response and raise your risk for disease.

Combat Your Stress

If you suffer from chronic stress and can’t influence or change the situation, then you’ll need to change your approach. Be willing to be flexible. Remember, you have the ability to choose your response to stressors, and you may have to try various options.

  • Recognize when you don’t have control, and let it go.
  • Don’t get anxious about situations that you cannot change.
  • Take control of your own reactions, and focus on what makes you feel calm and in control. This may take some practice, but it pays off in peace of mind.
  • Develop a vision for healthy living, wellness, and personal/professional growth and set realistic goals to help you realize your vision.

Relax and Recharge

Be sure to make time for fun and relaxation so you’ll be better able to handle life’s stressors. Carve some time out of your day—even if only 10 to 15 minutes—to take care of yourself. Also, remember that exercise is an excellent stress reliever.

Everyone has different ways they like to relax and unwind. Here are a few ideas to get you started:

  • Take a walk
  • Read a book
  • Go for a run
  • Have a cup of tea
  • Play a sport
  • Spend time with a friend or loved one
  • Meditate
  • Do yoga

While you can’t avoid stress, you can minimize it by changing how you choose to respond to it. The ultimate reward for your efforts is a healthy, balanced life, with time for work, relationships, relaxation, and fun.

For more ideas, visit the Manage Stress tutorial http://www.healthfinder.gov/HealthTopics/Category/health-conditions-and-diseases/heart-health/manage-stress on the U.S. Department of Health & Human Services website.

Source: U.S. Department of Health & Human Services Federal Occupational Health (www.foh.hhs.gov), adapted by IlluminAge AgeWise.

Is Online Socialization Really Socialization?

Spending time with others is crucial for the physical and cognitive health and all-around quality of life of seniors. University of Chicago researcher John Cacioppo even says, “Chronic loneliness belongs among other health risk factors such as smoking, obesity or lack of exercise.”

But many seniors live alone. Mobility challenges, retirement, vision problems, perhaps the loss of spouse and friends—all make it harder to stay connected.

Fortunately, like people of every age these days, many seniors are supplementing in-person social connections with social media and other online technologies. Indeed, Pew Research Center reports that people over 65 are the fastest growing group to take up email, Facebook, Twitter, blogging, Skype and other electronic communications. The question is: Are these forms of communication really effective in meeting the social needs of older adults?

Many experts say yes! While online connections can’t completely take the place of in-person visits, or a hug, or meaningful time spent in the presence of others, studies are showing that it can be a beneficial supplement to more traditional human interaction:

  • Online social contact builds continuity in relationships, allowing for frequent interaction that was not available in the days when letters or long distance phone calls provided the only connection with far away friends and loved ones.
  • Online communications provide intellectual stimulation, keeping seniors in touch not only with friends and families, but with the world at large.
  • These technologies can be a lifeline for those with health problems that keep them confined to home.
  • Seniors who socialize online are also likely to increase their in-person social activities.

In December 2014, University of Exeter researchers reported the results of a two-year experimental program that supplied vulnerable older adults aged 60 to 95 with a computer, broadband connection, and training. Reported the team: “Those trained had heightened feelings of self-competence, engaged more in social activity, had a stronger sense of personal identity and showed improved cognitive capacity. These factors led to overall better mental health and well-being.”

Said senior participant Margaret Keohone, “Having this training changes people’s lives and opens up their worlds, invigorates their minds and for lots of us gives us a completely different way of recognizing our worth as we age.” Keohone said that before she began the program, “I was just slipping away into a slower way of life.”

Families, senior living communities and other organizations that serve the senior population are finding that with a little help getting set up, older adults can take advantage of these tools to feel more plugged in to family and community events.

Copyright © IlluminAge AgeWise, 2015.

The Best Way to Protect Your Memory? Follow an Overall Wellness Plan!

March is Brain Awareness Month.

We read a lot about the “mind-body connection” these days. Most of us realize that the way we think about things can influence the health of our entire bodies. But it’s important to know that this works both ways: our overall wellness affects the health of our brains.

We used to think of “the mind” in an abstract way, as something somehow separate from our bodies. But new imaging techniques now allow researchers to observe brain function in ways that would have seemed like science fiction only a few years ago. Some scientists have described these images as “portraits of the formation of thoughts.” And what they see confirms again and again that brain health is closely interrelated with whole body health.

Recent studies link brain health with:

Heart health. We’ve long known that getting enough exercise, and controlling our weight, blood pressure and cholesterol all benefit our hearts. Now, it is clearer than ever that the lifestyle choices we make for cardiac wellness also benefit our brains. According to the American Heart Association, “Preserving a healthy blood vessel wall is important in preventing cognitive impairment.”

Diabetes. The American Academy of Neurology released a study showing that people with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes appear to be at higher risk of developing the plaques and tangles in the brain that are associated with Alzheimer’s disease. Said study author Kensuke Sasaki, MD, “It’s possible that by controlling or preventing diabetes, we might also be helping to prevent Alzheimer’s disease.”

Dental health. Tooth loss and gum disease have also been linked to an increased risk of dementia. Several recent studies suggest that good oral hygiene protects cognitive health. According to Dr. Nozomi Okamoto of Nara Medical University in Japan, “Infections in the gums that can lead to tooth loss may release inflammatory substances which in turn will enhance the brain inflammation that hastens memory loss.”

Hearing loss. Johns Hopkins University researchers reported in the Archives of Neurology that older adults with moderate to severe hearing loss may be at higher risk of developing dementia. While the connection is not yet fully understood, the authors suggest that hearing loss may result in “exhaustion of cognitive reserve,” when our brains become stressed with the extra work required to hear. Hearing loss also leads to social isolation, which is another risk factor. The researchers emphasize that current technology often can help seniors improve their hearing—and this new study should provide extra motivation to seek out state-of-the-art hearing loss treatment.

These are just a few of the studies that demonstrate the importance of following our healthcare provider’s advice to best manage health conditions. We know more than ever before that healthy aging lifestyle choices serve double duty: when we improve our diet, add more exercise to our routine, give up smoking, reduce stress, and manage any health conditions we have, we benefit not only our bodies but also our minds.

Source: IlluminAge AgeWise, 2015